Under the Families First Coronavirus Act (FFCRA), employers with fewer than 500 employees are required to provide paid sick leave (EPSL) and paid FMLA leave (FMLA+) for certain reasons related to the Coronavirus pandemic. The law went into effect April 1 and its obligations continue through December 31, 2020.

Employers need policies and forms to

For the past month, I’ve been in the leave law trenches with several Littler colleagues Alexis KnappJim ParettiSebastian Chilco and Michael Lotito. The ‘virtual’ trenches, that is, which serves them well, as they have no clue I’ve spent nearly the entire time without a shower and in my PJs.

When

Who wants Part III? Come on, you know you’ve been craving this all weekend.

More FAQs. 

It’s like winning a cake eating contest, and the prize is . . . more cake.

Late Saturday night, the Department of Labor issued a third round of Q&As (FAQs #38-59) aimed at helping employers administer emergency paid sick

Thanks to those who attended my webinar on Monday with my Littler colleagues Alexis Knapp and Jim Paretti on “Practical Issues for Employers in Navigating the New Federal Emergency Paid FMLA and Sick Leave Mandates.” A link to access the recording and PowerPoint slides can be found here.

To the nearly 14,000

When:  This Tuesday, March 24, 2020 (11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. central time)

Online registration: Click here

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed into law the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which aims to provide initial relief to American workers of certain covered employers in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. 

A week doesn’t go by without a client asking me whether they can discipline an employee for exceeding the number of absences allowed on their FMLA medical certification. The fact pattern usually goes something like this:

Johnny is an assemblyman at your 200-employee facility. He assembles johnson rods. He also has a chronic bad