Just three days ago, the U.S. House of Representatives passed sweeping legislation providing employees FMLA and paid sick leave in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Before the ink of that legislation dried, however, the House late last night made a number of so-called “corrections” to the original legislation that considerably modifies key aspects of the

Over the past several years, as employee leave of absence legislation has become increasingly complex, employers have asked us to create a product that provides timely analysis of all the changes in state and local leave of absence laws.

Clearly, there is a need to stay up to date on these changes, since they significantly

2013 military-leave.jpgIs Congress poised to amend the Family and Medical Leave Act again? Late last month, legislation was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives that would allow employees who work part-time or for small employers up to two weeks of leave in connection with a family member’s military deployment, thereby expanding the qualifying exigency provisions

civil union ring.jpgIllinois currently has no equivalent of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act.  Soon, it may.  And unlike the FMLA, the proposed Illinois leave law would allow civil union partners the same leave entitlements currently enjoyed by married couples.  Notably, because of the conflicting parameters of state and federal law, the proposed Illinois Family and

golden-retriever-boys-best-friend.jpgI love my Golden Retriever, Abby.  I really do.  But this development below is a bit too much, especially for this management-side attorney.

Is it possible that employees in Florida soon may be eligible to take a leave of absence when their pets are abused or subjected to the threat of abuse?  As Eric Meyer

Earlier this month, Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) introduced the Parental Bereavement Act (S. 1358), which would expand the Family and Medical Leave Act to provide job-protected leave due to the death of an employee’s son or daughter.  In a press release, Sen. Tester said he introduced the bill because the “last thing [parents] should be worrying about is whether