Clinton pneumoniaDisclaimer! Disclaimer! This is not a political post. This is meant to be good, clean fun. But where current events meet the FMLA, I’m as giddy as a five-year old boy coming eye-to-eye with his first dump truck!

Unless you’ve been living under a rock the past week, or you plug your ears and go

100.jpgThere must be something in the water.  Over the past few months alone, I have reviewed a number of employers’ policies and correspondence regarding an employee’s return to work from a leave of absence.  What has been surprising to me is the number of employer policies that require an employee to return from leave with

On February 15, the Department of Labor published proposed regulations to the Family and Medical Leave Act in three specific areas: 1) Military Family Leave; 2) Flight Crew FMLA Eligibility; and 3) the manner in which employers calculate increments of FMLA leave.  We summarized those changes here.

Public comments originally were due by April 16, 2012. 

08_colbert-pg-horizontal.jpgAccording to Forbes and other news sources, Stephen Colbert has taken a leave of absence from his late-night comedy show, “The Colbert Report,” to attend to his ailing 91 year-old mother.

Only a true FMLA nerd would use this as an opportunity to explain a little-used, often forgotten rule under the Family and

f18_2hr.jpgOn January 30, 2012, the U.S. Department of Labor announced proposed changes to Family and Medical Leave Act regulations (pdf) in three specific areas: 1) Military Family Leave; 2) Flight Crew FMLA Eligibility; and 3) the manner in which employers calculate increments of FMLA leave.  Rules for the first two have been expected for some

All too often, employers are criticized for blunders they could have avoided when taking disciplinary action against an employee with a medical condition.  However, a recent federal appellate court decision provides a glowing example of how an employer got it right when it disciplined an employee upon her return from leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act. 

Last month, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals found that a drug company did not violate the FMLA when it demoted a top-level executive upon her return from maternity leave for performance deficiencies unrelated to her FMLA leave.  Schaaf v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. d/b/a GlaxoSmithKline (pdf).


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