EEOC-bannerFor years, employers across America have been clamoring for guidance from the EEOC about how they should manage an employee’s request for extended or intermittent leave from work and how much leave is considered as a reasonable accommodation under the ADA. This week, employers received an answer.

Well, kind of.

Yesterday, the EEOC issued a

no restrictionsDo you know what happens when you maintain a policy or practice that requires an employee to return to work without restrictions or “100% healed”?  You pay.  A lot.

Just ask Brookdale Senior Living Communities. Brookdale employed Bernadine, who suffered from fibromyalgia. According to the EEOC, Brookdale refused Bernadine’s accommodation requests for a temporary modified

woman_pregnant_child_stomach_brother_sister.jpgEna Wages served as a property manager for one of several apartment complexes owned by Stuart Management Corp.  She began her employment on November 17, 2008, and this is significant under the FMLA because nearly one year later, on November 13, 2009, Ena’s physician restricted the number hours she could work as a result of

100.jpgThere must be something in the water.  Over the past few months alone, I have reviewed a number of employers’ policies and correspondence regarding an employee’s return to work from a leave of absence.  What has been surprising to me is the number of employer policies that require an employee to return from leave with

linkedin-facebook-twitter.jpgWith the growth of blogs and other social networking like Linkedin and Twitter, news comes at us fast and furious these days.  In a recent blog post, LexBlog CEO and legal marketing guru Kevin O’Keefe cited a recent survey finding that 55 percent of people hear about breaking news on Facebook and 20 percent on

When: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 (12:00 – 1:15 p.m. CDT)

On-line registration: Click here

On Wednesday, August 31, I will host a complimentary webinar addressing key questions and topics essential to understanding an employer’s obligation to provide leave as a reasonable accommodation under the ADA.  I am extremely pleased to be joined by